After School: Facts and Figures

Risk Factors

  • On school days the hours from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. are the peak hours for juveniles to commit crimes, be victims of a crime, be in or cause a car crash, smoke, drink or use drugs, and/or engage in sexual activity.
  • Only 15 % of school-age children participate in after school programs.
  • Just 7% of children in rural working families attend after-school programs, parents of these children are more likely than parents of urban and suburban families to say the program their child attends is the only one available.
  • In Florida, 19% (541,481) of K-12 youth are responsible for taking care of themselves after school.

Did You Know?

Only 15 % of school-age children participate in after school programs.

Attendance/Need

  • Overall, more than 4 in 5 parents (84 percent) report that they favor public funding for afterschool opportunities in communities that have few opportunities for children and youth, a slight increase from 83 percent in 2009.
  • 89% of Florida parents support public funding for afterschool programs.
  • 89% of parents with a child in an afterschool programs say they are satisfied with the program.
  • In 2014, approximately 19.4 million children (41%) not currently in an afterschool program would be enrolled in a program if one were available to them, according to their parents. By comparison, in 2009, parents of 18.5 million children (38%) said they would enroll their child in an afterschool program if one were available, up from parents of 15.3 million children (30%) in 2004.
  • Of all Florida children not currently enrolled in afterschool, 46% (1,031,509) would be likely to participate IF an afterschool program were available in their community

Did You Know?

Of all Florida children not currently enrolled in afterschool, 46% (1,031,509) would be likely to participate IF an afterschool program were available in their community.

Income Gap/Race Gap

  • 56% of low-income households report that the cost of afterschool programs was a factor in their decision not to enroll their child, compared to 48% of higher-income households. In 2014, parents who pay for afterschool report spending an average of $113.50 per week on afterschool programs.
  • Half of children from low-income households not participating in an afterschool program would be enrolled if one were available to them, 16 percentage points higher than for children from higher-income households (34%).
  • Close to half of Hispanic parents (48%) and 46% of African-American parents report that a very important factor in their decision not to enroll their child in an afterschool program is that afterschool programs are not available in their community, compared to 38 percent of Caucasian parents.
  • The lack of a safe way for their child to get to and come home from an afterschool program was cited as barrier to enrolling their child in a program by 55% of African-American parents, 53% of Hispanic parents and 54% of low-income households, compared to 48% of higher-income households and half of Caucasian parents.

Did You Know?

Half of children from low-income households not participating in an afterschool program would be enrolled if one were available to them, 16 percentage points higher than for children from higher-income households (34%).

Parents Matter

  • The survey finds overwhelming agreement, especially among parents with children in an afterschool program, that afterschool programs help working parents. More than 8 in 10 parents (83%) of children in afterschool programs agree that afterschool programs help working parents keep their jobs. Overall, 3 in 4 parents agree that afterschool programs help give working parents peace of mind about their children when they are at work, and among parents with children in afterschool, agreement jumps to 85%.
  • Almost 3 in 4 parents (73%) and 4 in 5 parents of participants (83%) agree that afterschool programs can help reduce the likelihood that youth will engage in risky behaviors, such as commit a crime or use drugs, or become a teen parent.
  • Approximately 4 in 5 parents overall (79%) and nearly 9 in 10 parents of afterschool program participants (88%) agree that afterschool programs can help children develop social skills through interaction with their peers.

Did You Know?

Almost 3 in 4 parents (73%) and 4 in 5 parents of participants (83%) agree that afterschool programs can help reduce the likelihood that youth will engage in risky behaviors, such as commit a crime or use drugs, or become a teen parent.